An Interview With Myself Part I

You are the core of our being; all of the other parts of the body are felt to be part of you. When any part of the body is hurt, you feel hurt. When our body feels well, you feel well. We know we are alive because we feel ourselves as “I.” I have never died, but I know it is the “I” that feels the dying. It is the “I” that stops existing in the form in which we are used to when we die. — Annemarie Roeper

Me: Let’s begin. I have been looking forward to this interview for a long time. We have been on the planet now for seventy years and so in the words of Mary Oliver – “Tell me what it is you plan to do with your one wild and precious life.”

I: I no longer make plans, except for airline reservations. This moment is truly all that matters.  I know we live in a world of memories and dreams which place us in the past or in the future, but time is an illusion. Anyhow, the plans we made for our life never seemed to work out the way we planned. Did they?

Me: Our plans may not have worked out but our life certainly has. Wouldn’t you say? I mean, look at us. We’re retired, living in Fiji, and our book is published.

I: Yes, our life has worked out as you put it but very little from anything we planned. It worked because we learned to flow with life more than to fight it.

Me: When do you think that happened for us?

I: I would say around the time we left the corporate world and started to simplify our life a bit.

Me: Boy that was a rough time. We gave up so much.

I: We gave up a lot of stuff, the role play we were in, and the social constraints to which we were enslaved.

Me: What do you mean by constraints? We were living it up big time in those days and eating high on the hog.

I: The constraints were defined by the life we were living. We were not free. We were in a maze of conformity, trying to fit in like everyone else. We even wore suits with white shirts and ties something we said in college we would never do.

Me: Yea, we were riding blind in those corporate days. We were loving and living the life everyone expected of us but we were a baby stumbling in the dark and trying to hide that fact from the world. We played “the role” well.

I: We were in fact trying to be normal, something at which we never succeeded.

Me: Thank you for that. I remember Maya Angelou’s words, “If you are always trying to be normal, you will never know how amazing you can be.”

I: That is true.

Me: Okay, let’s get back to the interview. I think you would agree that dreams have played an important role in our one precious life.

I: Yes, they have.

Me: What dream do you believe has had the most impact on our life and why?

I: That would be the Creation Dream. It was a dream perched on the boundary between the etherial and the physical realms. It is how we came together. We had it three times in our late forties. The exact same dream.

Me: I was hoping you would pick that one. I still have some uncertainty about its ethereal and physical meanings.

I: I think that is why we had the dream three times over a three year span of time. It was significant. It was suppose to be remembered.

Me: Okay, begin.                                                                           To Be Continued…